53.289954, -4.367426

About Us

Hi I’m Lisa. Welcome to Islandeering I’m an islandeer, author and marine conservationist and passionate about sharing what I have learnt from my travels around the islands of the British Isles to help you find an adventure. I started the project 12 years ago after I had one of those light bulb moments and realised the pure magic that islands held for me. After meeting so many people on their island travels who shared my passion and told me that I must share my experiences so that others could do the same I set up Islandeering.com, where we are passionate about promoting responsible travel to our great British islands.
Learn More

Join our Islandeering community

We have a lot of fun here, as we continuously find new islands and meet plenty of great folks along the way. Join our community to get new routes and adventures, latest blogs and news by using the email box below. Tune in also to our Facebook and Instagram pages to see where we are going next.
High Point: Yr Arwydd (178 metres)
Population: circa 70,000
Size: 71480 hectares
Wild Factor: 9 out of 10

Overview: Mam Cymru, ‘Mother of Wales’ is the largest island in Wales and England with its own set of fascinating satellite islands, a stunning coastline, charming villages and Wales’ greatest concentration of ancient sites. Separated from the mainland by the Menai Strait, it remains a stronghold of Welsh language and culture and lies in the shadow of the mountains of Snowdonia. A land of druids and saints, it holds some of Wales’ finest chambered cairns and passages including Barclodiad y Gawres, the largest Neolithic tomb in Wales, and Bryn Celli Ddu, where you can join Druids and celebrate the summer solstice. There are also hidden holy wells and possibly the oldest Christian remains in Wales, close to Penmon Priory. The charming harbour town of Beaumaris, a World Heritage Site , boasts a castle feted as the most technically perfect in Britain. More recent remains on the island include the impressively located ruins of Porth Wen Brickworks and the surreal, colourful moonscape of the copper mine at Parys Mountain – once the largest in the world. There are fabulous wild beaches at Newborough Warren, Aberffraw and Dulas which are perfect for all sorts of outdoor activities, and bird hotspots at Cemlyn Bay amongst many others.

Type of island:  inhabited

Location: North Wales

How to get to Anglesey:

Road: two road bridges from mainland Wales cross the Menai Straits to Anglesey – the A5 from Bangor across the Menai Suspension Bridge and the A55 across the Pont Britannia so it is easily reached by car or bus and coach services.

Rail: direct links to London via Crewe station

Ferry: arrive at Holyhead from Dublin.

Getting around Anglesey: a 200-kilometre coast path around the whole island boasts some of the best scenery in Wales, while the extensive network of lanes and cycleways make cycling here a joy. Buses serve the main island hubs, villages and beaches. Trains  between Bangor and Holyhead serves several stations including Llanfairpwll,Rhosneigr, Ty Croes and Valley.

Best time to go to Anglesey: Anglesey offers something special every season. Spring and summer are when most visitors come to the enjoy its stunning beaches and multiple watersports. These are the seasons when the wildflower meadows and formal gardens bloom and the widest range of marine birds and mammals can be seen, including dolphins and puffins, especially on one of the wildlife boat trips. In Autumn the rich colours are not to be missed, especially in the island’s woods, and it’s also the best time to see red squirrels. Winter brings spectacular storms and exhilarating beach and clifftop walks, whilst snowdrops and winter aconites flourish during the colder months. Festive events like the Plas Newydd Christmas Fair and Beaumaris Victorian Christmas Markets bring an extra touch of magic to the island in these darker months.

Access to Anglesey:  two road bridges; ferry; air

Dog friendly: Yes

Food and drink: there are too many great options to mentio

Accommodation on Anglesey:

Camping on Anglesey: there are over 40 campsites in Anglesey

Motorhomes: there are multiple touring parks in Anglesey

Hotels, B&B and self-catering: Anglesey has a full range of accommodation

ContactsVisit Anglesey

Best things to do in Anglesey: 

  • Go to the beach
  • Walk the Anglesey Coast Path
  • Nant y Pandy Nature Reserve
  • Walk around Copper Mountain
  • Penmon Priory and Penmon Point
  • Explore Porth Wen Brickworks
  • Ancient tombs and villages
  • Cemlyn Bay tern

Nearby islands: whilst you are there why not explore:

Church Island – find out more here

LLanddwyn Island – find out more here

Ynys Fydlyn – find out more here

Holy Island – find out more here

  • Look out for:
    • Red squirrels
    • Dolphins
    • Puffins

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Related Posts

Walk the Anglesey Coast Path

Discover Anglesey's hidden beaches, spectacular cliffs and sea arches, charming fishing villages and more on this 200 km walk around the island's coastline

Learn More

Porth Wen brickworks

Spectacularly located at the bottom of cliffs with a ruined harbour, ruins of brickwork buildings, beehive kilns and a remote beach for a sheltered swim this is a treasure trove for explorers

Learn More

Explore ancient tombs and villages

Discover ancient tombs, villages and holy wells

Learn More
53.289954, -4.367426

About Us

Hi I’m Lisa. Welcome to Islandeering I’m an islandeer, author and marine conservationist and passionate about sharing what I have learnt from my travels around the islands of the British Isles to help you find an adventure. I started the project 12 years ago after I had one of those light bulb moments and realised the pure magic that islands held for me. After meeting so many people on their island travels who shared my passion and told me that I must share my experiences so that others could do the same I set up Islandeering.com, where we are passionate about promoting responsible travel to our great British islands.
Learn More

Join our Islandeering community

We have a lot of fun here, as we continuously find new islands and meet plenty of great folks along the way. Join our community to get new routes and adventures, latest blogs and news by using the email box below. Tune in also to our Facebook and Instagram pages to see where we are going next.
Distance: 157 km
Difficulty: Moderate
Method: Road cycling
Wow Factor: 8 out of 10

Key Facts

  • Location: North Wales
  • Size: 71,480 ha
  • Terrain: Mostly minor roads
  • Access: Road bridge
  • Height gain: 2691 metres
  • Map: Explorer 262 & 263
  • Starting point: Castle car park, Beaumaris (LL58 8RA; GR 53.265531, -4.088120)
  • Accommodation/food:

    There is a full range of accommodation and food throughout this route

  • Island Summary:

    Anglesey is a great place for cycling with stunning coastline and the unspoilt countryside, beautiful views, idyllic fishing villages and great pitstops. In short, cycling on Anglesey is a great way to get away from it all. This route around Anglesey hugs the coastline and visits most of Anglesey’s highlights including the Menai Bridge, Beaumaris Castle, the historic harbour of Amlwch, the beaches of Rhosneigr and Newborough Warren, along with the splendid views of the mountains of Snowdonia along the Menai Straits. Where possible it avoids the main roads.  This round Anglesey cycle route can be completed in two days. We based ourselves near Vallay and on day 1 cycled anticlockwise to Pentraeth (south of Red Dwarf Bay) then cycled to Llanfair Pwllgwyngyll to return to Vallay on the train. On Day 2 we caught the train from Vallay to Llanfair Pwllgwyngyl, cycled to Pentraeth and resumed the coast route back to Vallay.

  • Look out for:
    • Exploring the old port of Amlwch
    • Finding the lost lanes of Anglesey
    • Stretching your legs alongside the swirling waters of Menai Strait
    • Cycling the lanes through the dunes near Aberffraw
  • Route description:

    This is a full circumnavigation of the island mostly using tranquil and quiet island lanes. Most routes published by others use the main roads which can get very busy and fast. The route keeps as close as possible to the coast and stops at various picturesque ports and villages, with plenty of opportunities to sample local fare, enjoy the beaches and explore the numerous points of interest.

    It is possible to start at any point on this route. Our start point is from Menai Bridge with a ride along the quiet lanes to the picturesque fishing village of Moelfre. It rounds the northeast tip past the historic industrial port of Amlwch before dropping into beautiful Cemaes Bay.

    Heading south on the quiet lanes to Valley, the peace is often disturbed by low flying jets and it can be quite a buzz cycling alongside the runway. The route continues to the impressive sands and water sports mecca of Rhosneigr and on through the dunes behind the beach of Aberffraw. Using the small lanes the route goes through Llanfair Pwllgwyngyll (boasting the longest name for a rail station in the UK) and on to Menai Bridge. This makes a good place for a stop to walk to the base of the suspension bridge and watch the turbulent waters running through the Strait.

    The last leg again uses the quiet lanes to return to Beaumaris.

  • Getting there:

    The A55 North Wales Expressway links Holyhead with the UK motorway network; there are regular express trains from Holyhead; fast ferries link Dublin and Holyhead; and a scheduled air service from Cardiff

Download file for GPS

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