Alderney, Guernsey
Braye Beach

About Us

Hi I’m Lisa. Welcome to Islandeering I’m an islandeer, author and marine conservationist and passionate about sharing what I have learnt from my travels around the islands of the British Isles to help you find an adventure. I started the project 12 years ago after I had one of those light bulb moments and realised the pure magic that islands held for me. After meeting so many people on their island travels who shared my passion and told me that I must share my experiences so that others could do the same I set up Islandeering.com, where we are passionate about promoting responsible travel to our great British islands.
Learn More

Join our Islandeering community

We have a lot of fun here, as we continuously find new islands and meet plenty of great folks along the way. Join our community to get new routes and adventures, latest blogs and news by using the email box below. Tune in also to our Facebook and Instagram pages to see where we are going next.
High Point: 91 metres
Population: 2020
Size: 800 hectares
Wild Factor: 8 out of 10

Overview of Alderney The closest Channel Island to both Britain and France, it is the least well known and hardest to get to but very much worth the effort. With its unhurried pace of life and strong community spirit this is a ‘live and let live’ sort of island with a distinct lack of stifling regulations. It is stacked with Victorian fortifications, reinforced by the German army during the Occupation of World War II, that today makes for some adventurous exploration in tunnels by torchlight. There is also plenty of great wildlife to see here too. St Anne’s is a vibrant town with plenty going on and some great eateries as well as the main hub for a wide range of accommodation. See our guide for ‘What to do in Alderney
Type of island inhabited
Location Bailiwick of Guernsey, Channel Islands
Alderney’s highpoint 91 metres
How to get to Alderney The Little Ferry company is a seasonal inter-island passenger ferry running twice daily between Alderney and Guernsey
There are scheduled flights with Aurigny direct from Southampton and Guernsey and through routes from other locations
Getting around Alderney the best ways of getting around Alderney is walking its many fabulous footpaths, or by hiring a bike (if hiring a car note the maximum speed limit is 35 mph). There are also taxis and sightseeing tours, but most of the island attractions are within walking distance from St Anne’s with relative ease.
Best time to go to Alderney the best months for visiting Alderney are June, July, August, September and October with the warmest months being July, August and September. The coldest months are January and February and the rainiest are January, October, November and December. The best months for swimming are August and September. The not-to-be-missed Alderney Week is usually the first week of August, when accommodation is scarce.
Is Alderney dog friendly Dogs are welcome on all island paths, on all commons and on some bays (Clonque bay, Platte Saline and the rocky bays) all year round. There is a restriction in summer for the following bays: Braye, Saye, Arch, Corblets and Longis where dogs are banned from the 1st June until 15th September.
Food and drink on Alderney Alderney has a full range of eating and drinking options from high quality restaurants, great cafes with views to harbour fish and chips and quality international food. Here are our favourites:

Accommodation on Alderney staying on Alderney is a must to give enough time to appreciate this wonderful island. Alderney’s accommodation ranges from beachside camping to converted forts and 4 star hotels. Here are some of our favourites:

  • Luxury hotels on Alderney The Braye Beach Hotel is right on the beach which, along with its cinema and games room makes it perfect for a family holiday. It is also close to the harbour making it easy to join wildlife boat tours. Find out more here.
  • Mid-range hotels on Alderney Our favourite is The Georgian House, it’s a great all-rounder, centrally located and great value for money. As the social hub of the island it is always popular and the place to go to try well-cooked Alderney produce. Find out more here.
  • Camping on Alderney at Saye Beach Campsite is a wonderful place to experience the Alderney night sky. The campsite sits just behind the sand dunes with immediate access to the full sandy curve of Saye beach. You can hire a tent at Saye Beach Campsite or bring your own. Find out more here.

Contacts: Visit Alderney, tel. 01481 822333 or email tourism@alderney.gov.gg

What to do in Alderney check out our favourites here

Look out for:

Nearby islands: whilst you are there, why not explore:

Burhou

Guernsey – more here

Jersey – more here

Sark – more here

Herm – more here

What to do in Alderney

Find out the best things to do in Alderney

Learn More

Beaches in Alderney

Find the best beaches in Alderney for families, swimming and rock pooling

Learn More

Nature on Alderney

Find the best places to spot puffins, gannets, blonde hedgehogs and more on Alderney

Learn More

Best things to do in St Anne Alderney

Find out what to do in St Anne Alderney

Learn More

Alderney Camping

Island hotels, island campsites and more

Learn More

Ride the Alderney Railway

Take the 'Northern Line' to the seaside

Learn More

Spot Alderney's blonde hedgehog

Go on a night safari to spot Alderney's wildlife

Learn More

Go underground in Alderney's wildlife bunker

Learn more about Alderney's wildlife

Learn More

Explore Fort Tourgis

Explore Alderney's military history by torchlight

Learn More
Alderney, Guernsey
Braye Beach

About Us

Hi I’m Lisa. Welcome to Islandeering I’m an islandeer, author and marine conservationist and passionate about sharing what I have learnt from my travels around the islands of the British Isles to help you find an adventure. I started the project 12 years ago after I had one of those light bulb moments and realised the pure magic that islands held for me. After meeting so many people on their island travels who shared my passion and told me that I must share my experiences so that others could do the same I set up Islandeering.com, where we are passionate about promoting responsible travel to our great British islands.
Learn More

Join our Islandeering community

We have a lot of fun here, as we continuously find new islands and meet plenty of great folks along the way. Join our community to get new routes and adventures, latest blogs and news by using the email box below. Tune in also to our Facebook and Instagram pages to see where we are going next.
Distance: 18.2 km
Difficulty: Moderate
Method: Walking
Wow Factor: 9 out of 10

Key Facts

  • Location: Bailiwick of Guernsey
  • Size: 800 hectares
  • Terrain: Mainly coastal path with some rougher sections
  • Access: Ferry and plane
  • Height gain: 404 metres
  • Map: Bailiwick of Guernsey: States of Guernsey Official Map.
  • Starting point: Alderney Quay Lat 49.274313 Long -2.2015786
  • Accommodation/food:

    Plenty in St Anne; Old Barn café/restaurant Longis Bay; café at Saye Beach Campsite

  • Island Summary:

    Alderney is a rugged, wild and authentic island with the friendliest of locals and just a few miles from France where the swirling seas of the English Channel and the Atlantic meet. Described as a slice of Britain with a French dressing and the most fortified island of the Channel Islands the landscape is an ever present window to the strategic role it played in military history. Alderney is where the sea is blue even on the grey days of winter.

    Alderney’s Coast Path is a hugely varied coastal route passing most of the island’s fortifications and wildlife wonders. It follows a well-marked route with opportunities for diversions to see attractions, particularly the steeper and rougher paths on the eastern tip of the island to get goods view of the gannet colonies

  • Look out for:
    • Blonde hedgehogs
    • Puffins on Burhou island
    • Gannet colonies on Les Etacs and Ortac
    • WWII bunkers and forts
    • Swimming at Longis, Saye, Tunnel and Corblets Bays
  • Route description:

    The Alderney Coast Path is a dramatic 18 kilometre walk that passes most of the military fortifications, sublime beaches, incredible views and astounding wildlife with an optional extra tidal island. Starting at Braye Harbour, the northern section of the route passes the secret rooms and tunnels of the Cambridge Battery at Fort Tourgis and Clonque Bay. The route climbs to the cliffs of the island’s west tip for the best views of Sark, Brecqhou, Guernsey and Herm. Close by, a plaque and concrete gates mark the entrance of the former Lager Sylt, the only German concentration camp built on British soil. The wilder, inaccessible south coast is framed by dramatic cliffs and bordered by woodland and fields of dairy cows. At the island’s south-east tip the wide, sandy crescent of Longis Bay is bounded to the east by the tidal Raz Island and Fort Raz – an optional island to bag for the enthusiastic. Once back on the north coast the scenic Arch Bay, linked to neighbouring Corblets Bay at low tide, is connected to the island’s campsite via a tunnel. At the west end of crescent-shaped Saye Bay the tunnels, bunkers and the armoured cupola of Bibette Head are great to explore by torchlight. Further along the coast the impressive 19th century Fort Albert sits above Braye Bay, which curves its way around to the restaurants and harbour of Braye itself.

  • Getting there:

    There are scheduled sea and air links from the UK mainland, Guernsey, Jersey and France. The latest details can be found here

List   

Information
Click following button or element on the map to see information about it.
Lf Hiker | E.Pointal contributor

NO NAMED GPX   

Profile

50 100 150 200 5 10 15 Distance (km) Elevation (m)
No data elevation
Name: No data
Distance: No data
Minimum elevation: No data
Maximum elevation: No data
Elevation gain: No data
Elevation loss: No data
Duration: No data

Description

Alderney

Gallery

Related Posts